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So many of us try to cover up our grief--through numbing ourselves with drink. drugs, television, work. Grief has a way of paralyzing the soul. Few make it from grief to grievance, few find a purpose from their grief, but I do think that you and others who have found a way to 'grieve' their grief are the saved ones. If we all would express our grief and use it to fuel change, oh what a beautiful world we might live in! Peace...

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I couldn't agree more. It's too easy to numb the pain of grief. My advocacy allowed me to put the pain somewhere productive. But I also know that I got into relationship way too early so I could numb the pain of broken heart. When the relationship didn't work out and my heart was broken again, I now had to ultimately deal with Woody's death. It was now twice as hard. Ultimately, we must process the pain and be brave enough to look into the mirror of our soul...and feel it. Unfortunately the medical system wants us to believe if we are still grieving after 6 weeks we have "Prolonged Grief Disorder." Or my doctor who after Woody died asked if I needed something. When I told her that I think the drug is what killed him and then asked the question, "aren't I supposed to hurt? My husband just died." Her response was "But you don't need to."

What we resists, persists and will eventually come seeping out at the seams.

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This is such an important conversation. We are all living with post covid trauma. Thank you for your beauty and grace in the delivery of this important message.

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Yes my goodness - grief to grievance - that is the perfect way to describe the “everybody has a story” behind their accidental advocacy. Me included. Thank you!

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